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Equine sarcoids are the most commonly seen tumours in horses. Sarcoids are skin growths that are usually benign and do not metastasise to internal organs. Nevertheless, they are much more than mere cosmetic problems: they can quickly develop into aggressive tumours and cause serious harm. Sarcoids may appear as single or multiple growths and have a high rate of recurrence even after intense treatment. Learn here about equine sarcoids and the options for long-term treatment.
A blood count provides important information on a horse's health and is an essential part of veterinary diagnostics. However, interpreting a blood count is not so easy. Most horse owners don't know what to make of the lab values presented to them. Learn here what haemograms and complete blood counts can reveal, when to order which, and what further blood tests are available.
“Navicular disease” is the stuff of nightmares for ambitious riders: podotrochlosis (navicular inflammation, navicular disease) is one of the most common causes of chronic lameness in ridden horses. We’re here to tell you what navicular disease is, what causes this painful condition and how to best support an affected horse.
The basis for any proper equine diet is roughage. However, not all types of roughage are equally suitable for horses. Apart from fluctuations in quality, there are big differences in terms of tolerability. Find out what you should know about the different forms of roughage here.
You've decided to move your horse to a new yard. Or maybe you've just bought a horse which will now be relocating to his new home. You're excited and looking forward to it, but keep in mind that moving causes stress in your horse. Read on to learn why horses have problems moving to new homes and how you can make the move easier for your horse.
Besity and lack of exercise are often the causes for serious metabolic disorders. Topping the list is EMS, or Equine Metabolic Syndrome – a disruption of the horse's carbohydrate metabolism which can have serious consequences, including dreaded laminitis.
The tangy horseradish root's benefits on equine well-being have experienced a real revival in recent years. The Germany society "NHV Theophrastus" even awarded the horseradish plant the title of Medicinal Plant of the Year in 2021.
What amount of selenium your horse needs, how to detect selenium deficiency or selenium poisoning and how soil fertilization influences the selenium content in roughage is described by Ewalia in this article "Selenium for Horses".
The use of herbs and spices as supplementary feed is intended to promote animal health and improve performance. Historically, the use of herbal medicines can be traced back to early times. A brief outline of herbs for horses and pets by Bianca Becker-Slovacek.
What is meant by headshaking? Read up on symptoms and causes as well as treatment options. Adaptogenic plants give hope...
We have a few tips to give your horse relief and information on sweet itch: What is sweet itch and how can I help a sweet itch horse?
Whether in show jumping, dressage or other equestrian sports: the muscles are the most important basic requirement for keeping the horse healthy. Read how you can naturally support the muscle development of horses.
Gastric ulcers in horses - undesirable and often unnoticed. Often different symptoms are not attributed to stomach pain. What you should know about stomach problems in horses.
Mud fever, sweet itch, equine sarcoids and many other disease profiles are signs of a weakened or overactive immune system in a horse. In this context, people talk about immunoglobulins, immune defence, antigens and antibodies, but how does the immune system really work and, above all, how can we as people support the immune system of our horses?
If your horse shows marked changes in behaviour or appearance, such as skin change problems, laminitis, weakened immune system, cardiovascular problems, fat deposits or other symptoms, your horse probably suffers from Equine Cushing's Syndrom (ECS), also popularly known as just Cushing's. This is a very complex disease that is currently not curable. The horses that contract it are typically and almost without exception 15 years old or older. Younger horses can also suffer from Cushing's, but that is very rare.